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Sleep

How Much Sleep Do You Really Need?

Sleep affects many aspects of your health. Get enough of it and you’ll have an improved mood, enhanced concentration and better memory. You’ll also lower your risk for a number of health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and obesity.

But when it comes to the amount of sleep you need, there’s not a one-size-fits-all number. There are several factors that determine how much you need.

One of these factors is age. For example, the youngest babies need the most sleep because they are developing so quickly – both physically and neurocognitively. Older kids and teens still need a lot of sleep but their growth is less neurocognitive and more physical – they continue to grow on a daily basis.

Here’s a rough guideline for how much sleep is needed at different ages:

Age Recommended Hours of Sleep
0-3 months 14-17 hours a day. Sleep may be broken up into short periods.
4-11 months 12-15 hours a day. Babies within this age range usually start following a more regimented sleep schedule.
1-2 years 11-14 hours a day
3-5 years 10-13 hours a day
6-13 years 9-11 hours a day
14-17 years 8-10 hours a day
18-64 7-9 hours a day
65+ 7-8 hours a day

Other factors that affect the amount of sleep you need include current health, chronic pain issues, medications and the quality of sleep you’re able to get each night. To achieve a higher quality of sleep, read 8 Tips for Better Sleep.

Edward-Elmhurst Health’s sleep medicine specialists* can help you get the right amount of sleep. We help patients identify what may be preventing them from getting enough sleep as well as changes they can make to get the best and most restful sleep possible. We can also help patients make lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, to improve their sleep quality.

To find out how you can get better sleep, schedule an appointment online or call (630) 527-6363.

Make an Appointment Online

* Note – not all Edward-Elmhurst sleep medicine specialists see pediatric patients (17 and younger).

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